RCB v Cape Cobras, CL T20, Group C, Bangalore - Duminy's 99 outdoes Bangalore

Written by chalu on Thursday, October 8, 2009 at 11:17 AM

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Cape Cobras 184 for 5 (Duminy 99*) beat Royal Challengers Bangalore 180 for 4 (Taylor 53*, Uthappa 51) by five wickets

At this venue in 2008, Brendon McCullum slammed the most famous Twenty20 century to knock the stuffing out of Royal Challengers Bangalore. On another starry South Indian night, against the hosts again, JP Duminy struck the most awesome 99 you will see in this format to take the Cape Cobras to a thrilling last-over victory.

And so a new chapter in the rapidly growing Twenty20 format has begun. After a gala opening ceremony reminiscent of the opening night of the first IPL, the two teams treated a capacity Chinnaswamy Stadium to a superb exhibition of Twenty20. Anil Kumble had no hesitation in batting first on a good batting track and 20 action-packed overs later the Cobras had their task cut out, after Robin Uthappa and Ross Taylor starred in a powerful batting display. But Duminy thumped five sixes and eight fours in as clinical and perfect a display of shotmaking as you could hope to see, and his partnership of 61 with Ryan Canning transformed the game after Bangalore had grabbed three early wickets in defence of 180.

Full report to follow…

20 overs Royal Challengers Bangalore 180 for 4 (Taylor 53*, Uthappa 51) v Cape Cobras

Robin Uthappa paved the way with a belligerent but plucky half-century, being dropped on 18 and miscuing more than a few between catchers, and an astonishing assault from Ross Taylor rounded off a powerful batting performance. Anil Kumble had no hesitation in batting first on a good batting track at the Chinnaswamy Stadium and 20 action-packed overs later the Cape Cobras had their task cut out. They seemed distinctly overawed by the moment and a packed house breathing down their necks, misfielding with alarming regularity and serving up a dozen too many full tosses.

Final report to follow...

Toss Royal Challengers Bangalore opted to bat v Cape Cobras

And so a new chapter in the rapidly growing Twenty20 format began. After a gala opening ceremony reminiscent of the opening night of the 2008 IPL at this very venue, Anil Kumble won the toss and opted to bat against Cape Cobras in the first match of the first Champions League Twenty20.

An estimated 50,000 strong Bangalore crowd gathered much before the event kicked off in anticipation of a cracking game. When Kumble won the toss, a deafening roar went about the Chinnaswamy Stadium. Bangalore went in without Dale Steyn. The Cobras fielded their strongest side.

In a short time frame, cricket as a sport has been noticed globally as a modern and very marketable product. At the heart of that has been the rapid rise of the Twenty20 format. Tonight a new chapter begins, and one that could dictate the future of club cricket.

Royal Challengers Bangalore: 1 Manish Pandey, 2 Jacques Kallis, 3 Roelof van der Merwe, 4 Rahul Dravid, 5 Ross Taylor, 6 Robin Uthappa, 7 Virat Kohli, 8 Mark Boucher (wk) 9 Praveen Kumar, 10 R Vinay Kumar, 11 Anil Kumble (capt).

Cape Cobras: 1 Andrew Puttick (capt) 2 Herschelle Gibbs, 3 Henry Davids, 4 JP Duminy, 5 Justin Ontong, 6 Ryan Canning (wk), 7 Vernon Philander, 8 Rory Kleinveldt, 9 Claude Henderson, 10 Monde Zondeki, 11 Charl Langeveldt.

Champions League Twenty20 - Cape Cobras won by 5 wickets (with 2 balls remaining)

Written by chalu on at 10:58 AM

Bangalore 180/4 (20/20 ov)

Cape Cobras 184/5 (19.4/20 ov)

Cape Cobras won by 5 wickets (with 2 balls remaining)

  • Champions League Twenty20 - 1st Match, Group C
  • Twenty20 match | 2009/10 season
  • Played at M Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore
  • 8 October 2009 - day/night (20-over match)









Royal Challengers Bangalore innings (20 overs maximum) R B 4s 6s SR
View dismissal JH Kallis c †Canning b Langeveldt 8 9 1 0 88.88
View dismissal RV Uthappa c Gibbs b Zondeki 51 39 7 2 130.76
View dismissal R Dravid run out (Philander/†Canning) 28 24 2 1 116.66
View dismissal V Kohli st †Canning b Henderson 17 14 2 0 121.42

LRPL Taylor not out 53 24 4 4 220.83

MK Pandey not out 10 10 0 0 100.00

Extras (lb 4, w 9) 13











Total (4 wickets; 20 overs) 180 (9.00 runs per over)
Did not bat RE van der Merwe, MV Boucher, P Kumar, R Vinay Kumar, A Kumble*
Fall of wickets1-14 (Kallis, 2.6 ov), 2-82 (Uthappa, 10.5 ov), 3-97 (Dravid, 12.6 ov), 4-115 (Kohli, 15.2 ov)










Bowling O M R W Econ

View wicket CK Langeveldt 3 0 12 1 4.00 (1w)

RK Kleinveldt 4 0 45 0 11.25 (1w)

VD Philander 2 0 21 0 10.50 (1w)
View wicket M Zondeki 4 0 39 1 9.75 (1w)
View wicket CW Henderson 4 0 34 1 8.50


JL Ontong 3 0 25 0 8.33 (1w)









Cape Cobras innings (target: 181 runs from 20 overs) R B 4s 6s SR
View dismissal AG Puttick* c Kohli b Kumar 11 11 2 0 100.00
View dismissal HH Gibbs c †Boucher b Kumar 0 1 0 0 0.00
View dismissal H Davids c Kohli b Vinay Kumar 27 21 2 1 128.57

JP Duminy not out 99 52 8 5 190.38
View dismissal JL Ontong b van der Merwe 19 14 2 0 135.71
View dismissal RCC Canning c Kumble b Kumar 20 18 1 0 111.11

RK Kleinveldt not out 5 2 1 0 250.00

Extras (b 1, lb 1, nb 1) 3











Total (5 wickets; 19.4 overs) 184 (9.35 runs per over)
Did not bat VD Philander, CW Henderson, M Zondeki, CK Langeveldt
Fall of wickets1-5 (Gibbs, 0.6 ov), 2-14 (Puttick, 2.4 ov), 3-62 (Davids, 7.6 ov), 4-103 (Ontong, 12.2 ov), 5-164 (Canning, 18.2 ov)










Bowling O M R W Econ

View wickets P Kumar 4 0 32 3 8.00


JH Kallis 2 0 18 0 9.00

View wicket R Vinay Kumar 3.4 0 40 1 10.90


A Kumble 4 0 35 0 8.75 (1nb)
View wicket RE van der Merwe 4 0 34 1 8.50


V Kohli

Bangalore 180/4 (20/20 ov)

Written by chalu on at 10:07 AM

Royal Challengers Bangalore won the toss and elected to bat

  • Champions League Twenty20 - 1st Match, Group C
  • Twenty20 match | 2009/10 season
  • Played at M Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore
  • 8 October 2009 - day/night (20-over match)









Royal Challengers Bangalore innings (20 overs maximum) R B 4s 6s SR
View dismissal JH Kallis c †Canning b Langeveldt 8 9 1 0 88.88
View dismissal RV Uthappa c Gibbs b Zondeki 51 39 7 2 130.76
View dismissal R Dravid run out (Philander/†Canning) 28 24 2 1 116.66
View dismissal V Kohli st †Canning b Henderson 17 14 2 0 121.42

LRPL Taylor not out 53 24 4 4 220.83

MK Pandey not out 10 10 0 0 100.00

Extras (lb 4, w 9) 13











Total (4 wickets; 20 overs) 180 (9.00 runs per over)
Did not bat RE van der Merwe, MV Boucher, P Kumar, R Vinay Kumar, A Kumble*
Fall of wickets1-14 (Kallis, 2.6 ov), 2-82 (Uthappa, 10.5 ov), 3-97 (Dravid, 12.6 ov), 4-115 (Kohli, 15.2 ov)










Bowling O M R W Econ

View wicket CK Langeveldt 3 0 12 1 4.00 (1w)

RK Kleinveldt 4 0 45 0 11.25 (1w)

VD Philander 2 0 21 0 10.50 (1w)
View wicket M Zondeki 4 0 39 1 9.75 (1w)
View wicket CW Henderson 4 0 34 1 8.50


JL Ontong 3 0 25 0 8.33 (1w)

RCB v Cape Cobras, CL T20, Group C, Bangalore -Taylor fireworks lift Bangalore to 180

Written by chalu on at 10:05 AM

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20 overs Royal Challengers Bangalore 180 for 4 (Taylor 53*, Uthappa 51) v

Robin Uthappa paved the way with a belligerent but plucky half-century, being dropped on 18 and miscuing more than a few between catchers, and an astonishing assault from Ross Taylor rounded off a powerful batting performance. Anil Kumble had no hesitation in batting first on a good batting track at the Chinnaswamy Stadium and 20 action-packed overs later the Cape Cobras had their task cut out. They seemed distinctly overawed by the moment and a packed house breathing down their necks, misfielding with alarming regularity and serving up a dozen too many full tosses.

Final report to follow...

Toss Royal Challengers Bangalore opted to bat v Cape Cobras

And so a new chapter in the rapidly growing Twenty20 format began. After a gala opening ceremony reminiscent of the opening night of the 2008 IPL at this very venue, Anil Kumble won the toss and opted to bat against Cape Cobras in the first match of the first Champions League Twenty20.

An estimated 50,000 strong Bangalore crowd gathered much before the event kicked off in anticipation of a cracking game. When Kumble won the toss, a deafening roar went about the Chinnaswamy Stadium. Bangalore went in without Dale Steyn. The Cobras fielded their strongest side.

In a short time frame, cricket as a sport has been noticed globally as a modern and very marketable product. At the heart of that has been the rapid rise of the Twenty20 format. Tonight a new chapter begins, and one that could dictate the future of club cricket.

Royal Challengers Bangalore: 1 Manish Pandey, 2 Jacques Kallis, 3 Roelof van der Merwe, 4 Rahul Dravid, 5 Ross Taylor, 6 Robin Uthappa, 7 Virat Kohli, 8 Mark Boucher (wk) 9 Praveen Kumar, 10 R Vinay Kumar, 11 Anil Kumble (capt).

Cape Cobras: 1 Andrew Puttick (capt) 2 Herschelle Gibbs, 3 Henry Davids, 4 JP Duminy, 5 Justin Ontong, 6 Ryan Canning (wk), 7 Vernon Philander, 8 Rory Kleinveldt, 9 Claude Henderson, 10 Monde Zondeki, 11 Charl Langeveldt.

Champions League Twenty20

Written by chalu on at 10:04 AM

Anil Kumble, Lalit Modi, Adam Gilchrist and other officials at a press conference

Champions League Twenty20 2009 -League will make domestic cricket stronger - Modi

Written by chalu on at 10:03 AM

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IPL commissioner Lalit Modi watches the game, England v India, ICC World Twenty20 Super Eights, Lord's, June 14, 2009
Lalit Modi says the Champions League will encourage stars to play more domestic cricket © Getty Images
Related Links
Players/Officials: Lalit Modi
Series/Tournaments: Champions League Twenty20
Teams: India

Lalit Modi, chairman of the Champions League Twenty20's governing council, is certain the tournament will result in the "rapid growth" of club cricket around the world. Modi also said there was a strong chance the Champions League would be taken to non-cricket playing countries as a means to expand the game's reach and get other countries to embrace cricket.

"The Champions League has been developed to embrace club cricket all round the world," he said on the day of the tournament launch in Bangalore. "It's a place where we can find young cricketers who then play for their national sides. The IPL is a great example of a domestic club-level tournament, and similarly nations around the world have club tournaments. The objective here is not to make money, it is to build the game, to build club-level cricket, to find and nurture new talent. Money is not the criteria. The objective here is that we have some of the best players around the world and we hope that in years to come the Champions League comes to symbolise what the UEFA [version] is to football.

"From this year itself the tournaments in countries like Sri Lanka, New Zealand and West Indies will become more competitive. You'll see players who were not participating in domestic tournaments who will now take part and do well. Before, once players graduated from their clubs, they became international players and if at all they went back to their clubs they hardly played a few games. But the rules of the Champions League are that you have to play for your club, and your club must win to participate here. You won't get a chance to be here unless you've not played for your club."

Dean Kino, head of business and legal affairs for the Champions League, said one positive fallout of this competition would be to give context to domestic cricket. "It increases the passion of grassroots cricketers to be involved for their states and provinces. If you look at the interest in the KFC Twenty20 Big Bash in Australia and the IPL over the last six months, you will see that the result of going to the Champions League has been hugely stimulating. At the domestic level it will drive young cricketers to the game and that will build on domestic cricket and make it stronger."

Modi felt there was no better format than Twenty20 to draw new audiences and one way to do so was to broadcast matches across the world in different languages. While the current focus is to take the Champions League to participating nations, there is a definite plan to expand the competition. "That is a definite possibility. The immediate future is that we have South Africa, Australia and New Zealand as leading candidates and the objective would be to move within the participating countries," he said. "But we must make the competition more broadcast-friendly and show it to countries that have never seen cricket before. Like the IPL did, we have to get more women and children hooked onto this game."

The governing council has definite plans to take the tournament on the road, with Modi confirming that future editions will move from country to country. Kino said the concept was to move the competition around as much as possible. "We will look at newer, cricket-playing countries primarily but beyond the next ten years a decision will be taken as to whether it is appropriate to bring the game to non cricket-playing countries. We want to take the grassroots level of cricket to as many countries as possible."

To make the Champions League more prestigious, one change could be to increase the number of participating teams, something the governing council will decide on after the inaugural tournament. Modi and Kino ruled out a home-and-away format, like in the IPL and other domestic tournaments, because of the obvious difficulties in flying teams across the world on a daily basis. "As a global league it is very important to get crickets playing all around the world and give them the opportunity to play on different surfaces, in front of different fans and cultures," Modi said.

The IPL, run by the BCCI, has been extremely successful and Kino was hopeful the Champions League would blossom with the inputs of Cricket Australia and other boards. "The Champions League doesn't arise from the IPL," he said. "Representatives of Cricket Australia, the BCCI and Cricket South Africa talked about the possibility of a Champions League even before the concept of the IPL was invented. We've been talking about this for years and it's been a matter of getting the right time and place to launch. Whereas the IPL certainly helped leverage interest in the event, the Champions League stands by itself as an international event. It becomes the apex of all domestic events around the world; its context and relevance is through domestic events."

Champions League Twenty20 - Think global, act local

Written by chalu on at 10:02 AM

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Herschelle Gibbs hit the ball sweetly during his 42, South Africa v Pakistan, ICC World Twenty20, Trent Bridge, June 1, 2009
The presence of big names like Herschelle Gibbs helps Cape Cobras secure better sponsorship deals than the Eagles © Getty Images
Related Links
News : Meet the teams
Analysis : Records galore for competing teams
Series/Tournaments: Champions League Twenty20
Teams: Cape Cobras | Eagles | Otago | Sussex

When the Champions League begins amid the now-typical glitz and glamour in Bangalore on Thursday evening, much of the buzz will centre on how the tournament - and the concept - could change the game of cricket and the lives of the cricketers. For the suits who keep the game's economy moving, cricket's first global inter-club tournament opens up a whole new set of opportunities for advertising and sponsorship. Teams from outside India, keen on grabbing a slice of the one pie that has stayed reasonably intact through the recession, seek Indian sponsors who in turn see the benefits of overseas exposure.

In short, think global, act local.

That's what prompted the Sussex Sharks to tie up for this tournament with Royal Stag, a whiskey brand from the Pernod Ricard stable, for logos on helmets, caps and trousers, and Pepsi as shirt sponsors.

Sure, the tournament is played within the Indian marketplace and therefore viable for local companies but Sussex chief executive Dave Brooks underlines the bigger picture in seeking domestic sponsors. "We have a long historical link with Indian cricketers from Duleepsinhji and Ranjitsinhji to the Nawab of Pataudi and now Piyush Chawla. We are keen to build on that in the largest cricket market in the world and our heritage makes us attractive to local sponsors."

You don't even need a historical context - the Eagles, South Africa's domestic Twenty20 runners-up, have tied up with Karbonn Mobiles, a relatively new entrant in the Indian mobile phone market and are eyeing more such deals. "There is a big market in India and the IPL and the Champions League Twenty20 serves as a great vehicle for any sponsorship and awareness campaign," Johan van Heerden, the Eagles chief executive, said. "The response from the Indian sponsors has been very good though it was very short notice."

There could have been issues with the teams' main sponsors back home but it doesn't seem to be the case. "Our UK sponsors, RDF IT Solutions, agreed to stand aside for this competition as they do not operate in the Indian market," Brooks said. Ross Dykes, chief executive of Otago Volts, has a slightly different explanation - the sheer magnitude of the Indian market. "There is no conflict with our domestic sponsors as they realise they cannot compete on a global market - particularly when we are playing outside their geographical sphere of impact."

Though the deals are short-duration, like the tournament itself, there is optimism about the prospects of a longer association. "The deal is short-term for the Eagles but, hopefully, it will be long-term for the South African teams that qualify in future," van Heerden said. "In fact, we are hoping for a long-term impact in the Indian market in terms of club branding as well." It's a sentiment Brooks echoes: "We expect our Indian deals to be short term but you never know - it may develop into something over the long term."

The feeling is mutual among the sponsors. For the fledgling Karbonn, who has also tied up with the Cape Cobras, the small step might just turn out be the proverbial giant leap and it's looking at cricket to help it bridge that gap. "Cricket in India is treated as almost a religion and the Twenty 20 format has wide appeal," said Sudhir Hasija, MD of United Telelinks, one of the stakeholders in the company. "This tournament gives us the opportunity to build brand awareness. We do plan to take Karbonn Mobiles global, and this gives us an opportunity for a wider exposure."

Sudha Natrajan, president and COO of Indian media management company Lintas, points to IPL 2 in South Africa as proof that global cross-branding can succeed. "The local sponsors would benefit as the feed is global and the tournament would go to different countries in the future. As the telecast would be global, having international players and teams to sponsor at relatively lower costs than it would to sponsor the international ICC teams would be an advantage for advertisers. And that's a win-win for the Indian sponsors."

Her one caveat: The sponsors should do deals on a year-on-year basis instead of firming up a three or five-year commitment.

The Otago Volts, New Zealand's Twenty20 champions, are yet to close any deal though they are in negotiations. That hasn't stopped them, though, from joining in the planning. Dykes suggests that national boards take an active role in ensuring the longevity of the sponsorships with every franchise of the particular country. "If the Champions League Twenty20 is ongoing, then any one of New Zealand's six provincial teams could be competing in the future. With little lead time available this time around, the sponsorships will be one-offs. However, to try and establish consistency, New Zealand Cricket (NZC) is looking at the sponsorships being longer term and applicable to teams in any given year."




"We have a long historical link with Indian cricketers from Duleepsinhji and Ranjitsinhji to the Nawab of Pataudi and now Piyush Chawla. We are keen to build on that in the largest cricket market in the world" Sussex chief executive Dave Brooks




What Dykes, Brooks and van Heerden don't spell out, but which is implicit in their words - and in Natrajan's calculations - is the reasonable expectation among market watchers that the Champions League will eventually acquire the status, and consequently the longevity, of its more illustrious counterpart in European football.

"The possibilities are immense," said the head of an Indian media-buying agency. "It may travel the route of the UEFA Champions League. It will be interesting to see how the Indian fans, or even fans from the other clubs, respond to the occasion. In fact, the fan base will be another major factor that the companies will need to keep in mind in future."

What fans' response largely hinges on is star appeal - the more big names in a team, the greater its brand identity even if on-field performance is below par. Hence, Sussex know that Chawla's presence will help, as will the presence of bigger foreign stars "Players like Dwayne Smith and Luke Wright are well known in India," Brooks said, "and by the time we head home, a few others will be too."

That's what Otago are banking on too. They aren't a household name in India by any stretch of imagination but they have a few players who are, and who could help them close the deals. "I am sure having names like Brendon McCullum in our side has a positive impact on how our potential sponsors view our commercial worth," Dykes said.

Eagles' van Heerden went a step ahead to compare his team's endorsement value with the other South African representative in the tournament, the Cape Cobras. With a number of big names including Herschelle Gibbs, JP Duminy and Charl Langeveldt, the net worth of the Cape Cobras far outweighs that of the Eagles. "We could see the difference between the two," van Heerden said. "The Cobras have world stars and that secured them far better returns on sponsorship."

Of course, not all the franchises have managed rich pickings. David Townsend, the New South Wales Blues communications manager conceded they have been unable to secure final sponsors and so will retain their current Australian sponsor, the Roads & Traffic Authority. They may have winners on the field in Brett Lee and David Warner but in the equally competitive world of boardrooms and bottomlines, they've already conceded bragging rights.

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